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Coastal, Inshore, Recreational

Phytoplankton Bloom, West Cork

We have been reading and re-reading this contribution, which we love, from Anthony Beese in Cork:

The fish seller in the English Market tells me about his amazing encounter with green lights on the strand at Inchydoney in West Cork. He was walking along the shore at 2 am on the morning of July 25th.

I am imprisoned by fairies for three nights and by sloth for three more, but on August 1st, Breda and I visit the strand at The Dock at Castlepark, Kinsale (formerly Jarley’s Cove) – a rocky cove filled with stoneless sand and a steep foreshore – artificially formed no doubt. Even in that sheltered place there are signs of the recent bloom. At the southern end of the strand, near rocks, the bioluminescence shows best, clinging it seems to small fragments of seaweed:

MOONFIRE (WATER FAIRIES)

We see
Lying under the last quarter of the moon,
Flickering lights at the edge of the slipping tide,
White sparks that run through a rocky gut,
And hints of blue and green
Suddenly lost in calms.
Dive in!

Irishmarinelife welcomes observations, questions and contributions of any kind….irishmarinelife@gmail.com

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Discussion

One thought on “Phytoplankton Bloom, West Cork

  1. Interesting! We have bio-luminescent jelly fish hear in Seattle, WA (in the Puget Sound). They are lovely!

    I would love to see a close of photo!!!

    Posted by gracewillard | August 19, 2010, 10:34 pm

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